Screening the Holocaust

Unit code : GERM30482
Credit rating : 20
Teaching period(s) : Semester 2


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Aims | Objectives | Assessment | Information | Course unit content |
Tutors | Timetable | Teaching methods |



Aims
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Objectives (Learning outcomes)

On successful completion of this course unit, students will have:

  • A broad understanding of the key themes and theoretical debates around Holocaust memory and representation in general, and Holocaust film in particular
  • Knowledge of important documentary and feature films on the Holocaust
  • A good grasp of key concepts in cinema studies.

Transferable skills:

On successful completion of this course unit, students will have further developed their ability to:

  • Work independently;
  • Argue critically and coherently;
  • Present information in a convincing and accessible manner
  • Develop an understanding of German history and culture in an international context.

On successful completion of this course unit, students will have further developed their ability to:
• Work independently;
• Argue critically and coherently;
• Present information in a convincing and accessible manner
• Develop an understanding of German history and culture in an international context. 


Assessment methods
Cathy Gelbin:Unit coordinator
Written exam:65%
Set exercise:35%

Information
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Course unit overview

This course unit will examine the filmic treatment of the Nazi atrocities from the late 1940s through to the present. Tracing the ongoing debates around appropriate modes of Holocaust representation, we will examine the major political and aesthetic issues at stake in feature film in particular. In so doing, we will consider film’s potential to convey the personal dimension of the Holocaust together with art’s ethical implications in the face of atrocity.

Among other themes, we will look at the unique vision of the Holocaust in East Bloc cinema, which pioneered central modes of Holocaust representation before 1989. Having looked at issues of gender, sexuality and generation in films from both sides of the Iron Curtain, we will finally turn our attention to the aesthetic and thematic approaches developed by the second and now third generation after the Holocaust. The study of German film in its international context will open up a comparative view of Holocaust film as a transnational body of works.


Teaching staff
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Timetable
Assessment written exam - 2 hours
Lectures - 10 hours
Seminars - 22 hours

Teaching and learning methods
  • 3 hours per week of lectures / seminars
  • 1 weekly screening generally of two hours

Language of teaching: English

eLearning: Select resources will be available on Blackboard. These will include copies of slides and hand outs used in classes, copies of and/or links to appropriate resources, and supplementary materials to aid students in preparing for seminars, presentations, and assessment.